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    0 0

    by bscox3

    WOW great! I need to incorporate this! I was getting to 7 and moving all to the beginning! LOL


    0 0

    by Dark_Knight

    No.

    Although I cannot recall any 1F buildings-nevertheless, you are not "building" this building-you are "buying" it....it is not part of your turn. You may buy (or sell) any number of other buildings, after which you may take your turn so-in direct response to your post:

    You are BUYING a building

    1-You do NOT move your worker to any construction building.
    2-You do NOT choose any building from your 3 'face cards' (what are these????) you buy the 1F building.
    3-Yes. Once you buy (or even build) a building-its yours unless you sell it.

    bscox3 wrote:

    I just cannot grasp this and I am so sorry.

    Its my turn:

    I have 1 Franc so I can "buy a building"

    1) i move my worker to a free construction location that is empty
    2) I choose a building from the 3 face cards that I have resources to "build"
    3) i place the choice in front of me for the rest of the game unless I sell it?

    I then can use these for free and charge others to use? tThe at the game I count all building I built or bought as VP based on the coin value?

    Thanks for wealking me through this

    0 0

    by louper

    Dark_Knight wrote:

    No.

    Although I cannot recall any 1F buildings-nevertheless, you are not "building" this building-you are "buying" it....it is not part of your turn. You may buy (or sell) any number of other buildings, after which you may take your turn so-in direct response to your post:

    You are BUYING a building

    1-You do NOT move your worker to any construction building.
    2-You do NOT choose any building from your 3 'face cards' (what are these????) you buy the 1F building.
    3-Yes. Once you buy (or even build) a building-its yours unless you sell it.

    bscox3 wrote:

    I just cannot grasp this and I am so sorry.

    Its my turn:

    I have 1 Franc so I can "buy a building"

    1) i move my worker to a free construction location that is empty
    2) I choose a building from the 3 face cards that I have resources to "build"
    3) i place the choice in front of me for the rest of the game unless I sell it?

    I then can use these for free and charge others to use? tThe at the game I count all building I built or bought as VP based on the coin value?

    Thanks for wealking me through this


    Did you read ANY of the other posts in this thread?

    The three "face cards" are pretty clearly (to me) the three topmost cards on top of the three construction stacks.

    It does raise a good point to the OP, though - you do know that EVERY building in the three construction stacks are face-up, right? You're correct in that only the top-most may be built (or bought) at any time, but they should all be face-up.

    0 0

    by klbush

    Boy, I still think this person is way off base. There are no 1F buildings. You do NOT have to move your worker to buy. You can buy from the as yet unbuilt building piles (top card of the 3 piles) OR you can buy any building already built by the town. This person needs to watch a learning video.

    0 0
  • 03/17/14--14:33: New Image for Le Havre
  • by ecspiegel

    Using a Plano 9 Compartment StowAway for goods storage. Makes setup and cleanup fast.

    0 0

    by comdotski

    Maybe the OP is mis-interpreting (or not expressing himself!) the cost to use a building that is not your own, often being 1F? :what:

    A video walk-through does sound as though it is in order!

    0 0

    by Eoin Corrigan

    Indeed - once the card is bought or built, the game makes no distiction.

    0 0

    by lostphd

    klbush wrote:

    Boy, I still think this person is way off base. There are no 1F buildings. You do NOT have to move your worker to buy. You can buy from the as yet unbuilt building piles (top card of the 3 piles) OR you can buy any building already built by the town. This person needs to watch a learning video.


    I think the reference to "having one franc" meant he had the entry cost for the building firm (the 6-point one that indeed, costs one franc or one food to use) and I am sure he meant he was building, and not buying, at that point. It is one of the harder distinctions in Le Havre - I mispeak all the time when teaching it and have to backtrack and say "no, sorry, I meant build."

    0 0

    by grant5

    bscox3 wrote:

    Ahh so i can aquire either way? Buy or build? I did rea the rules duh! Lol thanks for the help!

    Did you get confused and think you were in a reddit forum when you posted this? :what:

    0 0

    by Dark_Knight

    Entering a building and buying a building are so different that I did not think that that was what this person was referring to-not to MENTION the fact that the title of this whole thread is 'Buying v Building' as if that were where the distinction or issue was...oh well.

    Also-there was some Q in the original post about the 'money cost' of the building and its worth at (what I PRESUME to be game end-although those words seem to have been left off)

    PLEASE be aware that there are a number of buildings AND ships that have a cost that is different than its VP value-this is shown on the card in a smaller coin icon.....

    0 0

    by marticabre

    I stumbled into Le Havre thanks to the iPad. Before that I had seen the game but I did not play it because it seemed a little daunting, even though I had played Agricola. But Le Havre, with so many cards, and fish, iron, ships, buildings and everything, seemed even a little excessive. But even if sometimes less is more, then sometimes you learn that too much can also be good.

    Le Havre is the second installment of Uwe Rosenberg's Harvest Trilogy. If Agricola represented a small farm in XVII century Central Europe, Le Havre represents a busy French port more or less in current times. The game board represents a big harbor with many spaces where all kinds of goods arrive and a big display where dozens of buildings are put in display and are available to be build or bought. There's also a space to show the available ships and finally a center line where the players' tokens, wooden ships, move to represent the turn.

    The players' ships take turns in being the first in the line. The first ship in the line marks who is the active player. The active player can use a single action to pick up raw goods or enter a building to use its action, and there's also a free action to buy a building before or after the other action. You cannot enter a bulding if somebody else is inside. After a fixed number of rounds (which is the same whatever the number of player is), the turn ends and each player must pay an amount of food that increases each turn, much like in Agricola. Food can be substitued by money, though you'll usually want to save money for further buying. If you don't have enough food, instead of losing points you get a loan. So Le Havre starts where Agricola stopped and adds another dimension: money.

    And does money change the play a lot? I think that yes, it does. The final tally is based on the money each player has and the best way to earn money is by constructing buildings and ships using the goods. You can always buy them if you need their special effects, but you'll be losing money. And the smart increase of goods and money each turns makes only profitable to choose certain buildings in certain moments of the game. But constructing a building is not always that easy: some of the goods are raw (fish, wood, coal, clay...) and some other are manufactured (bricks, coke, steel...). You need some factory buildings to manufacture raw goods into manufactured ones that in turn will allow you to build further buildings. Or you can ship your manufactured goods to earn a good amount of money. Or even use the side effects of some buildings to get that money.

    Owning buildings is important because if another player uses one of your buildings they must pay you a fee (which can be goods or money), in the style of Caylus, and you can use it for free. So sometimes you'll want to build or buy a building not because it's central to your strategy but because you know that the other players will need it and you want to earn the fees.

    Getting goods and constructing buildings is not the only thing a player must do: they must get food each turn or else pay! The number of needed turn will increase each turn depending on the number of players, and some of the goods (fish, bread, meat...) provide differents amounts of food, with the processed food being more nutritive (and more expensive to obtain). Also, each ship you build will provide a base number of food that it's not expended and will be available each turn. Having ships then is quite important as they provide you with food and will allow for shipping goods later in the game.

    So in Le Havre we have to grab some goods, process them into manufactured goods, build some ships and send the goods away to earn money. Like in Puerto Rico? Well, not quite. This is not a carousel, it's a roller coaster. First because food will be really scarce and maybe for a few turns you'll get away with loans but sooner or later you'll have to have a plan to get enough food to stop losing money. And then there are the buildings themselves. There are dozens of buildings in Le Havre and only some of them are used in every game. The rest will only appear at random. This gives a lot of variety in the games. And the effects the buildings have can provide some nice combos that will only be available from time to time, as not all the precise buildings will be always in play. Maybe you smoked some fish to eat it but then a fish restaurant building appears to offer you a nice sum of money for your fish. Or a clothing industry makes hides and leather much more profitable. Or the guildhouse will increase the value of some specific buildings.

    Slowly with each play new possibilities will show themselves and you'll want to try them. But the game will be different and there will be slight variations in the new game that will make you doubt: was this other building so significant that changed the value of my strategy? Should I have changed priorities? My mid game has been well developed? The mechanics of the game will smoothly blend and you'll find yourself not thinking on rules but on global strategies segmented in early, mid and late strategies, like in other great strategy games, and on the short term tactics necessary to achive your strategies. After about 40 plays of Le Havre, what once seemed to me a daunting task has now evolved into a fantastic strategy game with many choices to make and many variants in each game to make all of them a different but fantastic gaming experience.

    0 0

    by zaphodunderworld

    I really don't get this. Selling a building is throwing away many points. I cannot think of any example where that is a wise thing to do. Who can give me some good examples?

    0 0

    by jreast

    Suppose you need the money to contribute towards a better building that is going to benefit you more because others are more likely to use it (and pay you) or it's a points multiplier like the bank, that's going to benefit you greatly. The other reason might be that you haven't got enough food and need to sell a build rather than take a loan.

    0 0

    by fnord23

    Sometimes cash *now* is far more valuable than points at the end of the game.

    Figuring out when those situations occur and exploiting them will noticably improve your gameplay and score.

    (For example, there are some early buildings whose primary purpose is to build, then sell for cash, which is then re-invested in even better places.)

    0 0

    by golden_cow2

    And remember, selling a building removes any worker who happens to be in it. You can sell a building in order to use it after someone else, or to use it twice in a row.

    0 0

    by dkeisen

    zaphodunderworld wrote:

    I really don't get this. Selling a building is throwing away many points. I cannot think of any example where that is a wise thing to do. Who can give me some good examples?


    I frequently build the sawmill early on and immediately sell it for $7 cash. It is very inexpensive from a resource perspective, but not particularly valuable to own as it does not provide any rent. I realize that I am giving up VP to do this, but early in the game I will take $7 cash over 14 VP most of the time.

    0 0

    by ayedub

    zaphodunderworld wrote:

    I really don't get this. Selling a building is throwing away many points. I cannot think of any example where that is a wise thing to do. Who can give me some good examples?


    When someone asks me this sort of question I ask them if they're doing loans right…you're not allowed to take a loan to enter a building, just for paying your workers or paying interest.

    Imagine this scenario:
    You have no money, but this is ok because on your turn will be the "Interest" circle and you will have to take a loan to pay it. So you'll pay your interest and pocket the 3 gold which will give you the money to enter the building you want…
    Except the person that goes before your turn visits a building you and gives you a gold for entry, now when it's your turn you CAN pay the loan so you do…only now you can't pay to enter that building you need.
    In this scenario your only option is to sell a building which you'll do depending on how badly you want to visit that other building.

    The other scenario I've seen (which was mentioned earlier) is to sell a building to kick someone off of it so that person can use it, but that's very situational.

    0 0

    by sfox

    I've also seen someone sell a building to buy a ship early in the game, this is usually done with the sawmill as it is easy to build it and is worth a lot of money as one of the other replies has already mentioned.

    0 0

    by Zark

    If you think how much food an early ship will give you over the course of a game, and that each food equates to a franc, it is a lot cheaper to sell the sawmill and lose 7 francs than to provide 30 odd food during the rest of the game

    0 0

    by Thunkd

    Selling a building that is occupied, especially toward the end of the game, is useful if you really need to take a certain action.

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