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BoardGameGeek features information related to the board gaming hobby

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    by DAAAN

    Le Havre isn't too complex, at least to start with. There are a few things to consider, but the game is pretty easy to get going and learn as you play because it presents you with relatively few decisions at the beginning. The gameplay gets more and more complex as the game goes on, but it doesn't frontload that complexity as opposed to say Caverna, which presents you with a vast array of options immediately.

    Similarly I haven't played Harbour, I never saw the need.

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    by Dark_Knight

    Fields of Arle and Caverna are both very very similar to Agricola-they both just essentially remove all that panic from trying to feed your meeps every harvest-so greatly reduced pressure-in my opinion, for that reason-neither one as fun.

    The wife and I play a lot of games and I am Uwes biggest fan-we have had tons of fun with

    -Ora et Labora
    -At the Gates of Loyang
    -Bohnanza (much lighter/quicker but still fun)

    Le Havre is an awesome game in its own right and certainly different than Agricola-but if I recall correctly-doesn't seem to play as well with just 2 players.

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    by DAAAN

    I've only ever played Le Havre at 2 and rate it very highly, so disagree with the assessment that it doesn't play well at 2. Tbe "optimal player count" on BGG tends to oscillate between 2 and 3, generally 3. The more players you add, the more downtime you get, which can crush the game.

    Fields of Arle is different to Agricola in a number of ways, but sufficiently similar to be recognizable. It has it's own distinct strategies and is more like a sandbox with a thousand options. I don't like it as much as Agricola or Le Havre, but it's still great.

    Caverna is a massive let down. Way too similar to Agricola. If you like Agricola a lot, you'll find that Caverna is way too forgiving. If you find Agricola too stresful, you'll find Caverna a refreshing change.

    At the Gates of Loyang and Glass Road are possibly the most different of the Uwe games. Loyang is really interesting as it punishes players who tend to push for a late game surge in points, which is really interesting to see in a game as most reward that. Glass Road has almost all the same resources as a big resource conversion game and a lot of stuff going on, but plays blindingly quickly, particularly at 2.

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    by Deep Silver

    Dark_Knight wrote:

    Le Havre is an awesome game in its own right and certainly different than Agricola-but if I recall correctly-doesn't seem to play as well with just 2 players.


    Disagree with the assessment for two players as I think it's excellent at that player count. At three players it opens up a bit more with two wharves and the loan strategy can become a viable one. It does take longer with three, though.

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    by Jasonbartfast

    I find them pretty similar, except of course that Le Havre is an order of magnitude more complex. I do think of Harbour as being a much better "short version" of Le Havre than The Inland Port.

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    by davypi

    Le Havre is much deeper and complex game. Billing Harbor has 20 minute version of Le Havre is simultaneously accurate and misleading. Some of the core mechanics are there, but so much more is lost when you compare a filler game to a heavy euro.

    What the two games have in common are: Single worker placement, resource collection, constructing buildings.

    What Harbour is missing: Resources have to be upgraded in Le Havre. Early buildings use clay, but later in the game, you have to convert clay into brick to build more advanced buildings. Harbour's core mechanism is the market manipulation. Prices in Le Havre are fixed. In Harbour you only score points from buildings, but in Le Havre you can win games by doing a lot of shipping and only a few buildings. In Le Havre, resources accumulate on their own each turn and you can simply pick up a pile of resources that nobody else has taken. (i.e. You don't have to use a building to gain resources.) Le Havre has a feeding/upkeep mechanism that forces you to produce food in addition to all the other things you want to accomplish. The decision tree in Le Havre is also much much wider as you have seven resource piles and a few dozen buildings to choose from on your actions. (Which may sound overwhelming but as the game goes on, some of these choices become obviously ineffecient.)

    Looking at the ratings in your profile, you like Concordia, Burgundy, and Dungeon Pets, so its clear that you don't shy away from complex games. Le Havre and Waterdeep are both based off of Caylus, so that you like Waterdeep is a also good sign. It does seem a bit odd that you've never played an Uwe Rosenburg game though. (Or at least not rated one.) Also, since you don't have very many negative ratings in your profile, its hard to isolate what you don't like. However, based on your current ratings, I would guess that Le Havre would be at least an 8.5 for you, probably a nine.

    A friend of mine and I played this quite often as a two player game and can now finish games in about 90 minutes. (This includes setup and breakdown time.) When we were less experienced, games were 2-2.5 hours.

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    by Dark_Knight

    Forgot about Glass Road-a real gem....also the Easter Bunny gave my wife a copy of Patchwork...thats quick and easy....

    TOTALLY AGREE about the "massive" ($97 massive) let down vis a vis Caverna...my copy remains NIS.

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    by DaveyJJ

    Merkator. Only Rosenberg game I enjoy (although Le Havre would be my second choice if I was forced at gunpoint to like another of his "games").

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    by grant5

    DaveyJJ wrote:

    Merkator. Only Rosenberg game I enjoy (although Le Havre would be my second choice if I was forced at gunpoint to like another of his "games").

    Your strategy of patrolling forums for Rosenberg games in order to make completely unhelpful comments will one day come to fruition by toppling his gaming empire!
    You're doing god's work brother, keep it up!

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    by Sonicwarhol

    At the Gates of Loyang or Merkator

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    by Sonicwarhol

    Harbour is a quick game and the way the buying of buildings and stock market work, it can end quickly with a run-away leader sometimes, but not always. But it's very light.

    Le Havre is a masterpiece of a game and hands down my favorite Uwe game, despite my At the Gates of Loyang image. It is much more complex and more thinky and just a GREAT experience.

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    by Stevieram

    Thanks everyone, the only uwe Rosenberg game I do own is patchwork, great game for what it is, never thought I'd like it looking at it, but we both do enjoy it, agricola and caverna don't really interest me, my wife loves Castles of burgundy but I'm not so keen, think it's the theme of these games just mentioned I'm not into. But then again patchwork theme isn't really interesting for me, one thing that does concern me with Le Havre is the game time, think sometimes my wife thinks certain games take too long, ie dungeon petz, a few acres of snow, I would like to keep at the 1.30hr max timespan.

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    by doctoryes0

    LH is best with two, by far.

    Given the arc - the fact that the game changes so completely as it progresses - I would be very surprised to hear that your wife thinks it is long.

    Set up, once you have the resources in little dollar store bins that you can play out of, is about 3 minutes. There is no reason not to play the short version if it really is a problem.

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    by doctoryes0

    LH is by far best with two. It is however an extremely interactive, aggressive, and even cutthroat game.

    LH with three plus becomes a sandbox game because you can't block or time key moves against two. With one opponent you spend as much time looking at their position and resources as your own.

    LH is the best 2p game I have ever played.

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    by adamredwoods

    The short game is a great way to introduce newcomers to Le Havre, but the long game is much more rewarding. I have plastic containers (the stackable round ones) for all the pieces and made PnP player mats to help accelerate the game. Four players, three new, took 2.5 hours for the short game (12 rounds).

    Player mats:
    https://boardgamegeek.com/filepage/106505/le-havre-player-ma...
    Containers 2.75 inch:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TGDARSW/ref=oh_aui_detai...

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    by dyepbr

    Le Havre is good with 2. But I do feel that after several plays, everyone seems to converge on a few main strategies, and try to do it better than everyone else (not necessarily a bad thing).

    Ora et Labora is good with 2 as well, and I actually prefer this to Le Havre. It has similar mechanics to Le Havre, worker placement, can use opponents buildings at a cost, double-sided resource implementation. The puzzle element of OeL definitely is fun. Even though it has a sandbox feel, I still find the decision making tight, while keeping multiple paths to victory.

    I haven't played Fields of Arle, so I can't comment on that.

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    by Stevieram

    Thank you again, we had a game of dungeon petz last night, and that took us a good 2hrs nearly, so maybe we would be o.k. Iv'e just seen that there is an iOS version, might try that 1st. Is it a game you're not sure who's won til the end? Or is it a game where it's obvious who's won ages before the end game?

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    by klbush

    Stevieram wrote:

    Iv'e just seen that there is an iOS version, might try that 1st. Is it a game you're not sure who's won til the end? Or is it a game where it's obvious who's won ages before the end game?


    IOS version is okay on an Ipad, but my iPhone screen is too small.

    All the scoring information is open information, so you could potentially calculate the scores as the game progresses, but it would be very difficult without using pencil and paper.

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    by terpitude71

    I wouldn't be too concerned with length. I took my wife and me a little more than 90 minutes for our first game, and I would expect our future games to be shorter as we become more familiar with the innerworkings. I also am not a huge Rosenberg fan (Patchwork excluded; terrific filler game) but I really liked Le Havre. I too started looking at it more after playing Harbour and am glad I picked it up.

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  • 05/24/15--18:00: New Image for Le Havre
  • by clickhand

    <div>Lunch 'n Le Havre</div>

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